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Former male jobs that are now open to Saudi women

In 2018, Saudi women were able to seize the opportunities available to them.

As several reforms planned by Vision 2030 aimed at empowering women, women have been able to access professions traditionally reserved for men in the Kingdom, such as firefighters, airline pilots and ambassadors.

Did you say firewoman?

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has taken a new step forward, reshaping the history of its society. Last December, Saudi Aramco, a Saudi oil company, trained two women in fire-fighting operations. As a result of this training, Ghaziyah Al-Dossari and Abeer Al-Jaber became the first two female firefighters in Saudi Arabia.

Firemans team during firefighting

Buckle-up!

On land and in the air, women have been making their mark for several months in professional spheres usually specific to men. Last July, the Oxford Aviation Academy, a flight school based in Saudi Arabia, opened its doors to women.

Hundreds of Saudi women applied, hoping to become true pilots after a three-year of education program. With this aviation school, which trains the country’s first female pilots, Saudi women are offered a historic opportunity to gain access to a position that has long been exclusive to men.

An ambassador in Washington

he kingdom has just appointed Princess Reema bint Bandar as the country's ambassador in Washington, USA © World Economic Forum / Boris Baldinger
The kingdom has just appointed Princess Reema bint Bandar as the country’s ambassador in Washington, USA © World Economic Forum / Boris Baldinger

On February 24, Saudi Arabia appointed Reema bint Bandar as the country’s ambassador in Washington. This is the first time a woman is appointed to this position in the kingdom.

Daughter of Prince Bandar ben Sultan, Ambassador of Saudi Arabia to Washington from 1983 to 2005, Reema bint Bandar was, for a time, a close advisor to Crown Prince Mohammed ben Salmane, as well as a spokesperson for the reforms undertaken by the Prince as part of Saudi Arabia’s modernization, including the opening of leadership positions to women.